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Treating. Eating.
And understanding
diabetes.

We are bringing you straight talk, straight from people with diabetes. So click to explore and watch what real people have to say about diet, exercise, and treatment for diabetes.

Brought to you by Sanofi

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If I Knew Then

Starting on insulin: a beloved matriarch took on the misconceptions, and took control of her wellbeing.

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If I Knew Then Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: More often than not, fear can be due to a lack of information. It’s true in life and it’s also true when you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. When someone mentions they have questions and may be a little nervous about insulin, I’m sympathetic, but I’m also going to dig in and find out what they’re concerned about. In this week’s “If I Knew Then What I Know Now,” we’ll meet JoAnn, a mother and grandmother who learned how to overcome her fears and take control of her diabetes.

JOANN: If I knew then what I know now, I would have taken insulin sooner. Because you feel better sooner, and you have more control. They made it like it was a last resort. You take this and you have really messed up, and that’s not true. Like certain diseases run in different families, and for me it’s like, “Who doesn't have diabetes?” you know? ‘Cause now it’s affecting my cousins, my first cousins and all, because our parents and grandparents. Even though the family history was there, nobody was really taking care of themselves or really understood what it was and was doing what they were supposed to do. So, needless to say, I kind of did the same thing for six years.

Look at my daughter, how cute…and she, too, now has type 2 diabetes, and she has an 8-year-old. But she went totally all out as to make sure he eats healthy. Her experience is totally different because he didn’t get anything sweet until he was a year old – a piece of cake. If I knew then what I know now, I’d tell her, “You’re going to be the one that has the child that breaks the cycle.”

And I’m proud to say…I helped her, yes. You're gonna have to make changes…and they’re not hard. It’s things that we should be doing anyway. …you know, It’s like taking on a new project. Do 60 percent, 70 percent. Get up to at least 80 percent to where you’re doing 80 percent right. Let’s hit the ground running with the education. Let’s change the way we’re eating.

Traditionally, being African-American, we go all out for the holidays, all right. You have a dessert table, the food. Do you need four or five meats? No. Do you need the chocolate cake, banana pudding, peach cobbler? Hecks no. What I did, I skipped the food and had all the desserts. So if I knew then what I know now, I would eat first, and then I’d have a little bit. Because we can have a little bit. You just cannot have a lot.

If I knew then what I know now, insulin would be one of the things that I would take. One of the tools that I would choose to use to help me with my diabetes. It’s gonna be a tool that you can take out of that toolbox and use. It’s gonna be one of your lifesavers. Not your only one, but one of them. Now, of course, that’s not a miracle, that if you do this, you don't have to do anything else. You still have to eat healthy, you still have to exercise. I may ride a bike, I may lay on the floor pretendin’ like I’m doing yoga. I say pretendin’ because I don't know whether I’m doing it right or not. I’m doing it with the DVD. But I’m doing stuff.

We have a disease, but if you do what you’re supposed to do, you will be fine. Because look at me. I’m 68, I’m still here and I’m doing it.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0338

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If I Knew Then

A summer at diabetes camp empowered Reggie's journey to learn more about his condition and share with others.

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If I Knew Then Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: One of the great things about life is that we generally get smarter the older we get. You know more today, than you did yesterday, right? That’s also true for those of us diagnosed with diabetes. In this segment of “If I Knew Then, What I Know Now,” we’ll meet Reggie, who began his diabetes journey early in life, and hear what he’s learned about good routines along the way.

REGGIE: If I had known what I know now back then, I would say that you will have a more than a normal life. You can do all things. You could go swimming, you could play football, you could travel. You can enjoy a birthday party. You will enjoy a birthday party.

Don’t ignore your diabetes. Don’t ignore the management of your diabetes. I know you want to be normal, but seek out education, seek out a management plan to control your diabetes. I know you want to party. You want to go and work and go to school, but take time out to understand what’s going on within.

Our father was a community coach. He coached many children in the community: basketball, football, other sports – track and field. And when Park and Rec came, we were in line with the other kids, not knowing that our father was at the table and said, “Son, you can’t play football.” You know you always want to be accepted by your father. The acceptance wasn’t there.

When I was diagnosed, Mama decided to send me off to diabetes camp. Because Mom and Dad, they did not know how to deal with, or did not know anything of diabetes. Because I didn’t know what to expect at first. But just being around a group of people who had diabetes who was dealing with many, many things, I wasn’t the abnormal, sickly child. I became someone special. I was amongst a support group and they were able to explain to me and educate me.

When I got back from, uh, diabetes camp, um, I learned so much I couldn't help but share it with others. I wish I knew what I know now when I was 19. I would eat one meal a day thinking that my blood sugars would not spike or go up, but it had the adverse effect. It wasn’t helping me; it was hurting me.

Now, I eat four meals a day, so that’s a long way from eating one meal a day. You know, you learn more the older you get. I would tell the 19-year-old: Stop ignoring diabetes. I would tell the 30-year-old to accept it more. I would tell the 40-year-old: Keep up the good work. You have discovered how to manage diabetes.

So, as you learn more facts about your diabetes, it will be empowering because you will overcome whatever situations that are put before you. Because you’ll be more in tuned to yourself to be able to, uh, to solve whatever comes your way.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0340

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Unsugarcoated: On Insulin

A roundtable discussion about starting insulin and how it can help you keep your levels in check.

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Unsugarcoated: On Insulin Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: Welcome back to “Unsugarcoated.” Today, we’re gonna talk about insulin. How are ya guys doin’?

JULIE: Doing good.

BRYAN: Great.

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

JOANN: Great.

ERRON JAY: Everybody’s good?

BRYAN: Oh, yeah.

JOANN: Everybody’s good.

ERRON JAY: How are those levels?

JOANN: Really good.

BRYAN: Nice and stable.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, so, how are we keepin’ these levels in check?

JOANN: Everything. What we eat, exercise.

JULIE: And checking, checking, checking – pricking our fingers.

BRYAN: Yeah, myself man, yeah.

ERRON JAY: Okay, now, did you think insulin was the end of the road as far as treatment is concerned?

BRYAN: I was really worried about it. And after talking with my diabetic educator, and my doctor, he, they got me settled down, I understood it, did a little bit of research on my own. Figured out that, you know, that what I had heard was just complete, you know, hooey. [Julie interjects: …false] And it – it’s been great.

JULIE: The first thing that I thought was, “My god, I must really be sick. And it went from a certain fear, to trepidation, and then I thought, no, wait.” As it turns out, I should have done it sooner. I really should have.

ERRON JAY: So, I see you agree.

JOANN: I agree wholeheartedly. When I finally started insulin, I felt so much better. But it wasn’t just the insulin, now. It was with the eating healthy – I don't like the word “diet.” And exercising. When I put all of that together, man, I felt – I felt wonderful.

ERRON JAY: That’s – that’s going into like finding that routine, right?

GUESTS: Right.

BRIAN: Oh yeah.

JOANN: Absolutely.

ERRON JAY: So, Bryan, tell me a little bit about your routine.

BRYAN: I get up in the morning and I take all my meds that I need to take for everything right off the bat. And take, my shots. And I take that all within about an hour’s timeframe, every day. And that’s all I gotta do for the day. So it was really easy for me to put a routine together like that.

ERRON JAY: So, diabetes can change over time, right? And your treatment may need to change.

JOANN: Definitely.

ERRON JAY: So you guys are all on insulin, we’ve discovered that. Has your doctor ever changed your insulin?

JOANN: Oh, yes. Yes.

BRYAN: Yeah. I’ve been a diabetic about 18-ish years and I’ve gone through 6 changes. [Erron interjects: Okay.] So, yeah, it’s not – it’s not, I would say probably unusual. Because I’ve heard from, most – most people I know that have it have said the same thing. Uh, but, it was no big deal. Be honest about what your symptoms are, what you’re feeling, what you’re experiencing, and they’re gonna know if you need to do something different.

JULIE: Absolutely. You keep that line of communication open with your – with your team. It’s your medical team.

ERRON JAY: Okay, I like that.

JULIE: And, um, even though they will change insulins or even treatments, you have to, um, be in that mindset that that treatment is gonna work for you.

ERRON JAY: It seems like you guys are living your best lives, so I feel like we should change the word to ‘livabetes’.

JULIE: (laughter)

JOANN: That’s a great name.

JULIE: Oh my goodness, that’s a great name.

BRYAN: I like that.

ERRON JAY: ‘Cause, you’re living with it.

BRYAN: Exactly.

ERRON JAY: You’re doing everything you have to do.

BRYAN: You know, when I – when I was first diagnosed, the first thought I had was, “I won’t be any different. I’m going to do exactly the same thing that I was doing before.” I kept officiating for over 10 years. I kept coachin’, okay? So, I kept – I kept doin’ all that. And – and because just like you said, livabetes. It doesn't have to mean you’re sittin’ in your bed or on the couch and, you know, just livin’ your life in this little bubble that you can’t do anything, anymore, [JOANN interjects: Absolutely.] or whatever. But every now and then somebody will make a question about, you know, well, maybe – maybe you shouldn’t eat that pasta, or something along those lines. An uninformed –

ERRON JAY: “You’re on an insulin, you shouldn’t have that pie.” type of ...

BRYAN: Yeah, uninformed, ignorant people don’t bother me. I just ignore ‘em.

JOANN: Of course not.

JULIE: One of the – one of the things along the way that you learn it’s your diabetes. It’s my diabetes. So, it’s up to me to control it.

JOANN: I feel like when they do that, what you’re saying, Erron, I – like I said, I bounce it back. “How do you know what I can do? You worry about you and I’ll worry about me.” Okay. So I’m great.

ERRON JAY: I like you guys … so you guys are empowered. I appreciate –

JOANN: Yes.

ERRON JAY: I – I appreciate you guys coming on and sharing your stories, um, tellin’ us how you feel. And, it’s a community, right?

BRYAN: Absolutely.

JULIE: We’re all in this together.

ERRON JAY: We’re all in this together, yeah.

JOANN: Yes, we are.

ERRON JAY: So, thank you guys for joining us for this episode of “Unsugarcoated,” and we’ll see you next time.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0341

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Unsugarcoated: Living with Diabetes

A roundtable discussion about staying true to your strategies for managing diabetes.

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Unsugarcoated: Living with Diabetes Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: Hey, hey, welcome back to “Unsugarcoated.” Today, me and my guests are gonna to talk about - diabetes. How you guys doing?

GUESTS: Great.

ERRON JAY: Feelin’ okay?

JOANN: Feel wonderful.

ERRON JAY: Like wonderful? Like great, or?

JOANN: Like party - time wonderful.

ERRON JAY: Well, let’s talk about parties. So, you’re out, you’re out and about.

JOANN: Right.

ERRON JAY: You’re at a party, say, a potluck, right? [JOANN INTERJECTS: OK.] And everybody’s bringin’, ya know, a dish from their own homes. They’re not necessarily makin’ it diabetic-friendly unless you’re going to an all-diabetic party. So how do you navigate, so say, at a potluck, or holiday Christmas, red velvet cakes floating around. Macaroni and cheese floatin’ around.

JOANN: Did you say potluck?

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

JOANN: So that means I have to bring something.

ERRON JAY: You do have to bring something.

JOANN: Okay, first of all, I’m gonna eat before I leave home.

ERRON JAY: Okay, that’s smart.

JOANN: And then I’m going to bring a veggie tray or a fruit tray because it’s what I can have.

ERRON JAY: Right.

JOANN: And depending on what they’re serving depends on whether I’m going to have sumpin’ sumpin’ or not. So if it’s not what I really want to eat, I’m good.

ERRON JAY: What’s a little sumpin’ sumpin’? What’s your favorite food?

JOANN: Chocolate cake.

ERRON JAY: Chocolate cake. [JOANN INTERJECTS: That’s right.] How often do you indulge in chocolate cake now?

JOANN: Now? (tsk) Do you want me to tell you the truth truth?

ERRON JAY: I wanna know the true true. Unsugarcoat it for me.

JOANN: Hey, probably two or three times a month.

ERRON JAY: Okay.

JOANN: But let me explain. I know how to move my carbs around in order to get that chocolate cake. [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: OK.] And I’m not gonna to eat a whole slice. I’m gonna share. And I’m not gonna bake it.

ERRON JAY: Ok, so, so we talk about sharing. So who, who are you sharing with? Who are you sharing that pizza with?

REGGIE: My friends, [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: OK.] my family.

ERRON JAY: The reason why I ask the question is, operating with diabetes, how does that affect the people around you?

RIVA: Yeah, well, basically around me is my husband. And, um, oddly, he said – he’s picked up good eating habits from me.

JOANN: There you go.

RIVA: And he’s Dutch, so he grew up in The Netherlands, where bread is a staple.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, bread is king.

JOANN: Yeah.

RIVA: And so he eats less bread now, and, um, and he’s fine with it, you know. It’s really incredible what you can get used to.

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

JOANN: Absolutely.

REGGIE: It becomes a lifestyle.

RIVA: Yeah, exactly.

REGGIE: Because, ah, when I as diagnosed, my mom worked in a – worked, in a, uh, factory, shoe factory. [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: OK.] But as, uh, she had to weigh out my calories, she went to college to become a dietician.

ERRON JAY: Okay, because you were young, right?

REGGIE: Yes, I was 8 years old. [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: OK] And it affected the way she cooked, overall.

ERRON JAY: So let me ask you this. So you have friends or, you know, family members in your lives and they’re just living life all willy-nilly and they wake up and eat, you know, a tall stack of pancakes, and you know, bacon and sausage and all the maple syrup they can have. And then lunchtime comes around and they’re eating four grill cheeses and a peanut butter and jelly. And then dinnertime comes around and they’re eating whatever they want, and dessert, does that upset you? Like, give me a word – give me, give me one word on how that, that – that makes you feel that you can’t necessarily do what they do.

REGGIE: It may make me feel anxious [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: Hm.] because I’m looking forward in their unhealthy lifestyle. And we know consequences that can come out of the, you know, unhealthy eating. So I’m anxious.

ERRON JAY: OK, how about you?

JOANN: It makes me kind of sad. [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: Yeah?] Because whether you have diabetes or some other disease, it’s so unhealthy to do. That’s not gonna benefit you no matter what. So it’s like why are you eating like that? Your body doesn't need all of that, and why are you doing it? So I just feel sad for them. I’m, I’m kind of like on the page with, huh, Riva. You’re in trouble.

RIVA: It’s interesting, right? It’s not, it’s not that we feel jealous. [JOANN INTERJECTS: Right.] It’s we feel bad for them.

JOANN: I feel bad for them. Because they’re on a path that’s not going to benefit them.

RIVA: Right, and we know that.

JOANN: Yes, definitely.

ERRON JAY: OK, so let me ask you this question: so, diabetes, alright? [JOANN INTERJECTS: Right] gift or curse?

REGGIE: Definitely, a gift.

ERRON JAY: Yeah?

JOANN: Yes.

REGGIE: Yes.

JOANN: Yes, yes.

ERRON JAY: Somebody expound on that for me.

REGGIE: Each person living with diabetes it seems the management of it is different. So if I share with you what I’m going through, it may help.

JOANN: Absolutely. Absolutely.

REGGIE: And the education part – there are so many people out there who don’t know [ERRON JAY INTERJECTS: Right] certain aspects of living with diabetes.

JOANN: Absolutely.

RIVA: Yeah, you know, (clears throat) ever since I was a kid I had the feeling I was here to help people, and I didn’t know how or what that looked like, um, but actually when I was getting married, uh, I went to a diabetes educator for the first time. I had already had diabetes for 32 years.

JOANN: Wow.

RIVA: And, now that I was getting married I knew it was important that I be as healthy as I could be. So it made me think, “Gee, I’d like to help other people be as healthy as they can be.”

JOANN: Wow.

RIVA: And it’s enormously rewarding, right?

EVERYONE: Yes, yes, it is. It really is. It is.

JOANN: When you share with somebody and you’ve made a difference. They have diabetes and they felt very low, and then you share your experience and then they look at you and they’re like, “Wow, I guess I can do that, too.” Sure, you can.

REGGIE: Yes, and they’re not alone.

ERRON JAY: Well, guys, this has been so enlightening. I appreciate you guys coming on to “Unsugarcoated,” sharing your stories with me, telling me how you feel, and the people feel around you. I definitely appreciate you guys, and I know they appreciate you. So we want to thank you guys for tuning in for this episode of “Unsugarcoated,” and we’ll see you next time.

JOANN: Yes.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0342

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Whether you have diabetes or not, there’s science behind insulin and how it works in the body.

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Insulin, Glucose, and You Video Transcript

When you hear the word insulin, you may think of a drug taken by people who have diabetes.While this is true, what you may not know is that insulin is one of the many hormones created in the human body.Insulin is important to the body. It allows blood sugar (or glucose) to get into cells to provide them with energy.When you eat, your body breaks down food into glucose in your small intestine.This is your body’s source of energy for everything it does, from working and thinking to exercising and healing.Glucose travels through your bloodstream, looking for individual cells that need energy.For glucose to get into the cells, it requires insulin.Insulin is the key that unlocks cells for glucose to enter and deliver energy.When insulin arrives, it signals the cells to activate glucose transporters.These transporters pull glucose through cell walls.When glucose moves into the cell, it delivers energy.

Insulin deficiency

Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas by specialized cells called beta cells. When glucose enters your bloodstream, the pancreas matches it with the right amount of insulin to move glucose into your cells. In people with diabetes, this process doesn't work as it should. In type 1 diabetes, scientists believe the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys beta cells in the pancreas. A person with type 1 diabetes loses the ability to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is not producing enough insulin to meet the body's needs. Over time, the amount of insulin typically becomes less and less.

Insulin resistance

In some type 2 diabetes patients, cells build up a resistance to insulin. Even though there may be insulin in the bloodstream, it is not enough to unlock cells to allow glucose to enter.As a result, it takes more insulin to find the right key to unlock the cell for glucose. This makes it more difficult for cells to get the energy they need.

The effects of diabetes

When glucose can’t get into the cells—either because there isn’t enough insulin or because the body is resisting it—glucose begins to build up in the bloodstream.

As a result, all that energy is wasted. It does not get to cells where it is needed. Without glucose in your cells, they lack the energy they require to keep your body working.

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Unsugarcoated

A roundtable discussion of managing diabetes and their experiences with Toujeo.

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Unsugarcoated Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: Welcome back to “Unsugarcoated,” Television for and by the diabetes community. In this segment of “Unsugarcoated,” we’re talking Toujeo insulin glargine injection, 300 units per milliliter. We’re going to ask our guests what they know about Toujeo, but before we do, there are some important things that you should know first.

Toujeo is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. It contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 milliliter as standard insulin has 100 units, per milliliter. Toujeo is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis and should not be used in children.

You guys are all on Toujeo, right?

GUESTS: Yes.

RIVA: Yup, we are.

ERRON JAY: If you had to choose a word or phrase to describe Toujeo, what would it be?

BRYAN: Consistent.

RIVA: Ah. You stole my word. That’s exactly what I was going to say. So my brain now goes to constant. There’s just a constancy about it.

JULIE: You’re kidding. Smooth. Smooth. Smooth transition. Smooth injection.

ERRON JAY: Perfect. I should note that Toujeo is not for everyone and individual results may vary. Do not take Toujeo if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo. And do not reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed.

So, what’s your day-to-day experience been now that you’re on Toujeo?

RIVA: Yeah. For me it’s been great. I take it the same time of day, every day. And it keeps my blood sugars in range throughout the day.

BRYAN: Yeah. It’s, It’s, Its part of your routine, just like brushing your teeth.

JULIE: And, and the key word: routine. So once we establish that routine, you know, it makes it a lot easier.

RIVA: It takes the thinking out.

JULIE: Yes, exactly. And like you mentioned, earlier, one shot, why not? Yeah.

RIVA: Why not. That works really well for me. Gives me a full day’s coverage and it keeps my blood sugars really stable.

ERRON JAY: Perfect. It sounds like you guys have found something that works for you that’s great.

You should also know that before starting Toujeo, it’s important to tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

I’m curious. Why did your doctor recommend Toujeo for you, JULIE?

JULIE: We have ranges that we want to be at, and so it was meeting the ranges that my doctor had put me on.

RIVA: I wasn’t getting enough coverage for the whole day, so my doctor and I talked about it together and decided this was a great choice. This allows my A1C to be in a level that I want it and my doctor wants it. So, it’s just great.

BRYAN: You know, one of the big reasons that my doctor and I started looking for something different was because my A1C had started to go up on the routine that I was on. So it had been working for a while and then it wasn’t working, which, you know, with diabetes that happens, you know. And so we were looking for something and I started – I started with the Toujeo and my numbers were back down where they needed to be.

ERRON JAY: Riva, what has been your experience with the SoloStar Pen?

RIVA: Yeah, I love the pen. It’s easy to use. Umm, Julia said something earlier about smooth experience, and that’s what it feels like using the pen.

BRYAN: Like, again, I said, for me, I was taking two injections a day and went down to one. And, a lot easier to integrate into the routine because, again, I didn’t have to think about this, you know, that I needed to stick myself late in the day.

ERRON JAY: Well, I have to say, this has been an awesome conversation. I want to thank our guests for coming by today. I hope you found this as interesting and as informative as I did, and I hope you’ll stop by again, soon, for another episode of “Unsugarcoated.”

ANNOUNCER: Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL per milliliter. Do not take Toujeo if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo.

Do NOT share your pens with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including

  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet
  • Sudden weight gain

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0288

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Amy shares her experience with Toujeo. Plus, she gives heartfelt advice for anyone who’s starting insulin.

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Toujeo Time Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: Now in terms of medication, you're on Toujeo®.

AMY: Insulin glargine injection, 300 units per milliliter.

ERRON: For those who may not be familiar, Toujeo is from the makers of Lantus®. It's a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. Long-acting insulin is taken once a day. It takes longer to start working in the bloodstream, but it lasts all day long.

AMY: Right.

ERRON: Also, Toujeo contains three times as much insulin in one milliliter as standard insulin, 100 units per milliliter.

[Phone buzzes] Hold on, I got to get this.

[Looks at phone] Hmm.

[Addresses camera] So there are limitations of use for Toujeo that everyone should know. Toujeo is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Also, Toujeo should not be used in children. So, Amy, how are you doing since you started on Toujeo?

AMY: My blood sugar levels are normal throughout the day when I measure, and my last A1C was in my target range.

ERRON: Ooh, that's great. I should note that Toujeo is not for everyone, and individual results may vary.

[Phone buzzes] But wait. There's more. This time it's Important Safety Information about Toujeo. Do not take Toujeo if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo.

AMY: Yeah, that's important.

ERRON: Also, do not reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. What would you tell somebody who is just getting the news that insulin is the next step for them?

AMY: That don't be afraid. This isn't about, you know, that your disease is so far gone that this is the only thing that's going to help you, that we're able to use that as a tool.

ERRON: That's—I think that's great advice.

AMY: So, yeah.

ERRON: I mean because you hear "insulin" or you hear "medication" period, and you're like—

AMY: Yeah. Yeah, it's like, oh, it's over.

ERRON: I'm only taking this medication because I am so bad.

AMY: Right. Right.

ERRON: But not the case.

AMY: No.

ERRON: You're taking this medication because you need it—

AMY: Right.

[Phone buzzes]

ERRON: Mom! No, no, no, no. No, no, mom. Ma! Ma! I'm doing an interview right now. I love you too, pooh bear. Okay, bye.

Sorry. My mother says, "Hello, Amy."

AMY: Hello, mom.

ERRON: Yeah. What are some of the names you've heard maybe diabetes be called other than diabetes?

AMY: Oh, the sugar is my favorite.

ERRON: The sugar.

AMY: The sugar.

ERRON: Oh, you got the sugar, baby!

AMY: Oh, well why are you doing that? I don't have the sugar.

ERRON: My sugar's in check.

AMY: My sugar's fine. And I check it and it's 327.

ERRON: Right. Right, because you ate three pieces of cake.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: With jam in it.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: Amy, thank you so much for joining me, keeping it real with me.

AMY: It has been my pleasure. It has been my pleasure.

ERRON: And, um, you're welcome back.

AMY: I hope we can get real again sometime soon.

ERRON: You're welcome back any time. Mi casa su casa.

AMY: Oh, thank you.

ERRON: Amy, let's move. Yeah, get that exercise in, girl. Yeah, you better boogie. Get it. Get it. Get it. This show has been brought to you by Toujeo. To learn more visit Toujeo.com.

What is Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL?

Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL)
  • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Toujeo® should not be used in children

Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

Please see link below for Full Prescribing Information for Toujeo.

[Whistles] Hey. All right. Wait, you're still here? Huh. Good on you.

[Whistles]

Now Playing:

He chose humor to get him through tough times. He shares his story in his own words.

Download transcript

Meet Bill Video Transcript

Bill: You know I find that humor makes people feel better. As someone who’s had type 2 diabetes for almost 20 years, I find it helps me get through some pretty rough spots.

Bill: I guess you could say humor comes naturally to me. I remember as a kid I thought I could be pretty funny.

Bill: I even did a stand-up act years ago in the late ‘80s, played comedy clubs all around the country. I couldn’t help it—I was always writing jokes, or finding the humor in things.

Bill: Comedy was fun, but then I thought it was time to settle down.

Bill: I work as a project manager now, but I still love to see people smiling and laughing.

Bill: I dress up like Santa at Christmastime for the kids at the local hospitals. With this beard, I’m pretty convincing. (chuckle) It’s fun for the kids, and it’s good for me to see them happy.

Bill: When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, it definitely changed how I went about my life.

Bill: For a while, I managed diabetes with medications. My family is very supportive. My wife, Tish, gives me endless encouragement and support. She has a good sense of humor, too, and she lightens up my day.

Bill: Then I went through a period where, I admit, I wasn’t doing that whole due diligence thing, wasn’t on top of it.

Bill: I didn’t eat right,

Bill: I didn’t exercise much.

Bill: After a long day at my office and commuting, I didn’t have the energy to work out. Plus, I wasn’t testing my blood sugar levels every day.

Bill: But I’ve never been one to quit. I’m just not that guy. It’s like someone flipped a switch. I said to myself…

Bill: “Bill, you gotta stop ignoring the obvious. This diabetes thing isn’t going to go away. Get with the program, do whatever you got to do to keep it in check.”

Bill: So I talked about it with my doctor, and told her about how my diabetes management was going. She explained that diabetes can change over time, and that the ways you manage it may have to as well. That’s when we decided that Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL was an option for me.

Voiceover: From the makers of Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL comes Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL. Toujeo® is a long-acting, man- made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL). Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Toujeo® should not be used in children.

Bill: Once-daily Toujeo® provides proven full 24-hour blood sugar control, and significant A1C reductions in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Voiceover: Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Bill: I take Toujeo® once a day at the same time every day.

Bill: Toujeo® works by slowly releasing small amounts of insulin to provide continuous glucose-lowering activity that lasts beyond 24 hours.

Voiceover: The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo® is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Bill: Now I’ve been eating better. I limit certain foods like pasta, bread, white flour, sugars.

Bill: I do a lot of salads, and sometimes fish, grilled chicken, that sort of thing. I’m also definitely more mindful when I eat out.

Bill: It was kind of like a breakup in a relationship---even though I still love them, we just aren’t good together anymore. (laughs) Cooking took on a new light with diabetes.

Bill: Also, my little dog Bella helps me exercise. My wife and I like to take her to the dog park. When Bella is worn out, I know my walk’s done for the day!

Bill: You just kind of have to look at it as, oh well, life is always full of things you have to do. So you might as well deal with them in a positive way.

Bill: And if you can find some humor in it, and laugh at yourself, that’s the way to do it. Now I look at food as part of my treatment, a smart way I can help control my blood sugar.

Bill: The SoloStar® pen has become part of my daily life now.

Bill: It uses a small, thin needle, and I don't have to press hard to get my dose. I also like that I only need to hold the button down for 5 seconds.

Bill: Now my numbers are where my doctor and I wanted them. My blood sugar levels are in a range we set. My last A1C test was in my target range.

Bill: Changing up your lifestyle can be stressful, but I’ve found change doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

Bill: Diabetes doesn’t have to be a struggle. If you work at it, you may end up a stronger person for it.

Bill: I guess I’ve learned that even though I love to make people laugh and help people, well…I needed to help myself, too.

Bill: My name is Bill, and I manage my type 2 diabetes with Toujeo®.

Bill: Now it’s your turn. Talk to your doctor to see if it’s time to work toward your diabetes management goals with Toujeo®.

Voiceover:

What is Toujeo®?
Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL)
  • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Toujeo® should not be used in children

Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.


Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are a disposable prefilled insulin pen. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.


SAUS.TJO.18.04.2715

Now Playing:

Vanessa walks Douglas through the reasons Toujeo may be right for him. From effectiveness to dosing, it’s all there.

Download Transcript

Is it Time to Consider Toujeo Video Transcript

Douglas: My goals are to be healthy, and to make sure I’m doing my best to manage my diabetes. My diabetes has changed over time, and I wonder if the way I manage it needs to as well. I’m ready to talk to my doctor, and learn about my options.

Vanessa: One option is Toujeo®

VO: (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL.

Vanessa: Toujeo® is a long- acting man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus.

Vanessa: Once-daily Toujeo® is proven to provide blood sugar control, and significant A1C reductions for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

VO: Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Vanessa: Toujeo® works by slowly releasing small amounts of insulin to provide continuous glucose-lowering activity that lasts beyond 24 hours.

VO: Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

Now Playing:

Amy talks about how she overcame her fear of injections.

Download Transcript

But it's a Shot Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, with me, your straighttalkin' host, Erron Jay!

ERRON: So I understand that you, uh, take insulin.

AMY: Mm-hmm. So for quite some time my diabetes was changing, but I didn't know.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: So when I went back to see the doctor, and I go in and we have the conversation where, "You're going to have to take insulin."

ERRON: Gotcha.

AMY: I took it very negatively, and, and, again, you know, you've got to remember I'm still in a place of fear. Right? So now one of my worst fears is coming true, and that is, wow, I must be really bad if I have to take insulin. Okay?Because only the really bad ones take insulin. Right? I mean that was my misperception.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: But it was still my perception. So that kind of flared my, my, um, my denial again, because, because, again, the whole denial, you know, my denial was all based on fear.

ERRON: Yeah.

AMY: And I'm a thinker. So it was like, you know, this is really what's going to help, and then, of course, the lizard side of my brain takes over and is like, "But I have to—it's a shot!”

ERRON: Right.

AMY: “It's going to hurt." Right? So, okay. I'm a nurse. Right?

ERRON: Right.

AMY: I can give shots to everyone. I can give shots to—yeah, not a problem. I can give shots without a problem. But giving it to yourself?

ERRON: That can be a big one.

AMY: That's a whole other story. So finally, finally, finally, I, I put the needle on, I prepped the pen. I kind of took a big, deep breath, and boom, I did it. It was kind of like [sings], I did it!

ERRON: Achievement unlocked.

AMY: Yes. The, the key to that whole thing—

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: —was, six months after I had started it, when I went back to the doctor,and she checked my A1C and she looked at my glucose logs, and we saw progress.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: And it's like, wow! I can do this!

ERRON: So you just had to rip the Band-Aid off.

AMY: I did. I did, and it was—

ERRON: You just had to do it.

AMY: Yeah, and of course it wasn't a fast pull. Right?

ERRON: Right.

AMY: You know, it took me a while.

ERRON: It takes a little bit longer.

AMY: So it was like, eek, eek, eek, yeah. So then it was kind of like, okay, okay, I think I got this. Okay, I think I got this.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

Now Playing:

How to Use the Toujeo® SoloStar® Pens

Let Amy (and Amy) show you how to use the Toujeo® SoloStar® pens.

Download Transcript

ANNOUNCER: These instructions do not replace the guidance of your doctor or the instructions for use that accompanies the Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL SoloStar® or Toujeo Max SoloStar® pens. People who have vision problems should not use the Toujeo SoloStar or Toujeo Max SoloStar pen without help from a person trained to use the respective pens.

MAX AMY: In this diabetes journey we’re on, have you ever wished you could go back in time and tell yourself the things that you know now, but you didn’t know then?

MAX AMY: Thanks to the wonders of modern technology, we can.

MAX AMY: Hey look at that, our first SoloStar pen! I remember that.

MAX AMY: It was a really big deal when I came home with my first pen – it feels like it was only yesterday.

PAST AMY: Oh hey, is that one the same as this one?

MAX AMY: Well your pen is the SoloStar. This one is the Max SoloStar. They’re very similar but there’re some really important differences – but I’ll get to those in a second.

MAX AMY: Did your doctor show you how to use it?

PAST AMY: Yeah, she showed me, but now that I’m home I still have some questions.

MAX AMY: Let me help you get the hang of this.

MAX AMY: There are six steps you need to know: Check the pen, attach the needle, test for safety, select the dosage, inject the insulin, and then remove the needle.

PAST AMY [repeating as if memorizing]: OK. Check the pen, attach the needle, test for safety, select the dosage, inject the insulin, and remove the needle.

MAX AMY: That’s it! You’re ahead of the game already! I knew there was a reason why I liked you.

MAX AMY: So before we do anything, we’re going to make sure the pen is at room temperature, that we have the correct pen, and that it’s working properly.

MAX AMY: Did you take the pen out of the refrigerator about an hour ago? ‘Cause cold insulin can be painful…

PAST AMY: Really? Who knew?

MAX AMY: You.

PAST AMY: Good point. This one’s been out of the fridge about an hour.

MAX AMY: Now look at your pen. I mean, really look at it.

MAX AMY: Is that your pen?

PAST AMY: Yeah.

MAX AMY: Great. Take off the pen cap and check the insulin. It’s clear, not cloudy?

PAST AMY: Clear.

MAX AMY: Perfect! If the insulin’s cloudy, don’t use it, just take it back to your pharmacy.

MAX AMY: Is it past the use-by date?

PAST AMY: Nope.

MAX AMY: Great! Now it’s time to attach the needle.

MAX AMY: Remember, you’re going to need a fresh needle every time you use the pen.

MAX AMY: Don’t reuse and never share needles.

PAST AMY: Even with you?

MAX AMY: Yes, even with me.

PAST AMY: What kind of needles can I use?

MAX AMY: These kind.

MAX AMY: Before you attach the needle, sterilize the tip of the pen with an alcohol wipe.

MAX AMY: Then with the needle you’re going to peel off the protective seal and screw the needle onto the pen until it feels fixed.

MAX AMY: Then you’re going to remove the outer cap and put that somewhere safe. Then remove the inner needle cap and throw it in the trash.

PAST AMY: Keep the outer cap, toss the inner, got it.

MAX AMY: That’s step two done! With me so far?

PAST AMY: I’m with you.

MAX AMY: Yes, you are. So, before we do anything else, we need to make sure the pen’s working properly.

PAST AMY: What could go wrong?

MAX AMY: Well, sometimes the insulin won’t come out, so we usually check for that.

PAST AMY: OK.

MAX AMY: Testing the pen also resets the dosage knob, which is also important.

PAST AMY: Great, so how do I do that?

MAX AMY: Turn the dosage dial to 3, then you’re going to hold it straight up and you’re going to press the injection button all the way in.

MAX AMY: If you see insulin coming out of the needle, then the pen is working and you’re good to go.

MAX AMY: However, if you don’t see insulin coming out, repeat that last step again.

MAX AMY: If you have a new pen, you may need to do this up to six times. Just to get that working. If it still doesn’t work, you need to replace the needle.

PAST AMY: Like in step two?

MAX AMY: Precisely. Oh and by the way, if you see bubbles in your insulin, don’t sweat it.

PAST AMY: Aren’t bubbles in injections bad?

MAX AMY: Nope, not here. You’ve been watching too much TV.

MAX AMY: Ready to inject some insulin?

PAST AMY: OK.

MAX AMY: First, we need to select the correct dosage. So we’re going to turn the dosage selector to your dose.

MAX AMY: Whatever you and your doctor discussed is what you turn the dial to.

PAST AMY: OK, I need 38 units, so I turn the dial to 38, correct?

MAX AMY: Correct.

MAX AMY: Now this is important: If you have the SoloStar pen, the increments on the dial are one click for one unit, but on the Max SoloStar pen, it’s one click for two units.

MAX AMY: So don’t dial your dose by counting the clicks, or you may dial the wrong dose.

MAX AMY: Either way, just turn the dial so your prescribed dose appears in this window. If there’s not enough insulin in the pen for your prescribed dose, you’ll only be able to dial to the amount that’s left in the pen, and then you’ll need to supplement with a new pen.

PAST AMY: How do I know whether I need the SoloStar or the Max SoloStar?

MAX AMY: As your diabetes changes, your dose may change too, so your doctor may recommend you use a Max SoloStar. Like me.

PAST AMY: That makes total sense.

MAX AMY: OK, we’re in the home stretch.

MAX AMY: Are you ready for your injection?

PAST AMY: Where can I inject?

MAX AMY: You can inject your dose here, here, or here.

MAX AMY: Push the needle into your skin, but don’t touch the injection button yet.

MAX AMY: Put your thumb on the button, press all the way in and hold.

MAX AMY: Hold the button in. When you see “0” in the window, then count to five to make sure you get your full dose.

MAX AMY: After counting to five, release the button and remove the needle from your skin.

PAST AMY: OK, that was pretty easy.

PAST AMY: Well, I barely noticed it at all. How do they do that?

MAX AMY: Thin needles.

MAX AMY: We’re almost done. Now we just need to remove the needle and throw it away safely.

PAST AMY: This really is pretty straightforward.

MAX AMY: I know, right?

MAX AMY: To remove the needle, get the outer needle cap we set aside earlier and carefully place it back on the pen. You put that somewhere safe, right?

PAST AMY: Yep.

MAX AMY: OK.

MAX AMY: These things are sharp. Avoid puncturing the cap, ‘cause it will go through.

MAX AMY: Grip and squeeze the widest part of the outer needle cap, then turn your pen several times with your other hand to remove the needle.

PAST AMY: But what if it doesn’t come off right away?

MAX AMY: Just keep trying, it’ll come off eventually.

MAX AMY: Once the needle’s been removed, then we dispose of it in a puncture-resistant container.

PAST AMY: Can I just leave the needle on and use it again later?

MAX AMY: No, that’s not a great idea for several reasons: It can leak or get clogged if you leave it on, air could get into the insulin, and there’s the possibility of a bacterial infection.

PAST AMY: So, do I need to put the pen back in the refrigerator when I’m done?

MAX AMY: Nope, that’s the great thing about these pens – you’re good for up to six weeks after your first use without refrigeration.

PAST AMY: Well that’s handy.

MAX AMY: It sure is.

MAX AMY: So, there you go. That’s all six steps of how to use the Toujeo SoloStar and Max SoloStar insulin pens.

MAX AMY: Just to recap, we learned how to check the pen, attach the needle, test for safety, select your dosage, inject the insulin, and then remove the needle.

PAST AMY: Hey, that was really straightforward. I know the doctor explained it to me, but it really helped to have you explain it again.

MAX AMY: No sweat.

PAST AMY: You know, now that I know, it’s pretty simple. If I wasn’t so nervous, I guess I could have taught myself to do it.

MAX AMY: Well, you know, you kinda did.

ANNOUNCER: An unopened Toujeo SoloStar or Toujeo Max SoloStar pen should be stored in the refrigerator with the pen cap on, at a temperature between 36 degrees Fahrenheit and 46 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius and 8 degrees Celsius) in the box it came in.

Do not freeze new pens.

Refrigerate pens until expiration date.

Discard pens after the expiration date.

An opened Toujeo SoloStar or Toujeo Max SoloStar pen should be stored at room temperature below 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 degrees Celsius).

Do not refrigerate an opened pen.

Keep out of direct heat and light.

Do not store your pen with the needle attached.

Store your pen with the pen cap on.

Keep pens and needles out of the reach of children.

Discard 42 days after first use, even if the pen still contains insulin.

Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL
Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.17.12.9487

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Let's Eat

Erron gets clever in the kitchen with two crafty cooks. Get recipes

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Let's Eat Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: Oh, hey! Welcome to this week’s episode of “I Have Diabetes: Let’s Eat.” I got to tell you, even with my diabetes, I am a sucker for breads and cake. Mmm, cake. But the truth is, I know I really can’t eat like that anymore. However, my friends have some ideas about low-carb baked goods that sound pretty tasty.

I want to introduce you to my friend, Riva, who I hear makes a killer seed loaf. Riva, bring in that seed loaf!

RIVA: Erron, here it is. What do you think?

ERRON JAY: Riva, that looks really tasty. Tell me a little bit about this.

RIVA: Sure. So, this is a high-fiber bread. It’s got sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, rolled oats, a little bit of coconut oil, some dried cranberries on top, and it’s absolutely delicious.

ERRON JAY: Okay. You mind if I taste it?

RIVA: Oh, please do.

ERRON JAY: Here we go. Mmm, Riva girl. This is tasty. This is tasty. So, it doesn't taste like it’s, uh, it’s supposed to be better for me.

RIVA: Well, the fact that it’s low-carb, and it’s got, um, a taste of sweetness from the fruit and the coconut oil, and really all the flavors come together and blend together. So it’s healthy, delicious, nutritious.

ERRON JAY: Riva, that is really, really good. Thank you so much for stopping by.

RIVA: For you, any time.

ERRON JAY: For me? Can I keep it any time?

RIVA: For you? Yes.

ERRON JAY: Thank you so much Miss Riva.

RIVA: You got it.

ERRON JAY: Look at that seed loaf, guys. It’s beautiful. So, next, I want to introduce you to Reggie, who tells me he has a bean flour muffin recipe that tickles my sweet tooth without ticking off my pancreas. Reggie, come on in. Make you some room over there. Look at these muffins. Hoo, hoo, hoo, Reggie! Okay, these look delicious! Tell me a little bit about ‘em.

REGGIE: Well, I love beans, and I love muffins. So, these are bean flour muffins, with rolled oats, the old-fashioned oats.

ERRON JAY: Okay.

REGGIE: And coconut milk, which is lactose-free. And it makes it a low-carb muffin.

ERRON JAY: It looks delicious. You know what I’m going to ask you, right?

REGGIE: Mm-hmm.

ERRON JAY: Can I taste it?

REGGIE: Sure.

ERRON JAY: Here we go! Get a little piece right here…

Hoo, hoo, hoo, mmmm, Reggie, Reggie, Reggie, this is delicious. Reggie, this is amazing. Hey, bean flour, huh?

REGGIE: Yes. High in fiber.

ERRON JAY: Is that why it’s better for me?

REGGIE: Yes.

ERRON JAY: Man, Reggie, this is absolutely great. So, can I have these?

REGGIE: Yes, you may.

ERRON JAY: I have a potluck to go to and I’m just gonna tell everybody I baked these. [Reggie interjects: All right.] All right?

REGGIE: Ok.

ERRON JAY: Let’s bring Riva back in. So, that’s all we have in this week’s segment of “I Have Diabetes: Let’s Eat.” You can find both of these recipes on our website. Until we come back, why not make these at home and let us know what you think? And we’ll see you all next time on “I Have Diabetes: Let’s Eat.”

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0494

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The Very Least

Join Erron and ease into activity with the help of an exercise buddy, Bryan.

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The Very Least Video Transcript

ERRON JAY: I don't know about you, but for me, staying active is about good habits. If I have a routine, I can stay with it, getting my heart rate going on a regular basis is a snap. But if I let things slide, that first step to establishing a routine can be tough. That’s why I decided we need to hear from Bryan, from Portland.

Bryan has been managing diabetes for almost 20 years now, and in that time he’s coached a few championship teams and found time to officiate a couple of sports leagues. He’s one guy who’s not gonna let a little diabetes stop him from being active. So, I’ve asked him to come by to take us through some light activities in a segment we like to call “The Very Least.”

BRYAN: Hey, man.

ERRON JAY: What’s up, brother?

BRYAN: How you doin’?

ERRON JAY: I’m doin’ all right. And yourself?

BRYAN: I’m doin’ awesome. Couldn’t be any better.

ERRON JAY: Okay, yeah. Well, I feel like I could be just a tad bit better.

BRYAN: You know, I used to feel like that, myself, and there were a few things that I did that, you know, really kinda got me back into movin’ and, you know, feelin’ better and gettin’ my strength back.

ERRON JAY: Like what?

BRYAN: Well, we’re going to use the wall, all right? This wall. And so you know, just-just like you’re going to do a pushup on the floor, all right, but you’re gonna have your feet shoulder-width apart, okay? Your hands about chest level, all right? And then just lean in, push yourself out.

ERRON JAY: Oh, okay.

BRYAN: See that, all right? Give it a try.

ERRON JAY: All right, here we go. So, shoulder-width.

BRYAN: Yep, shoulder-width.

ERRON JAY: Chest, [Bryan interjects: Mmm hmm…] a little angle.

BRYAN: A little angle.

ERRON JAY: My nice wood paneling, here.

BRYAN: Yeah, you like that? [Erron Jay interjects: Yeah …] Okay, all the way … now get that nose on the ground, on the wall … c’mon.

BRYAN: There you go. Looking good, man. Looking good.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, do I look like a Marine?

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Okay, oh, I feel it.

BRYAN: All right, you feel it in the arms?

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

BRYAN: Now, the great thing about this, you’re using your body weight and the angle determines how much of your body weight you’re using. So as you get stronger, just move your feet back. [Erron Jay interjects: Oh, okay…] So, it increases the angle and now you’re using more body weight to push off with your biceps.

ERRON JAY: Move my feet back until I’m on the floor.

BRYAN: Exactly.

ERRON JAY: That’s the goal.

BRYAN: You’re doin’ em right.

ERRON JAY: [Bryan interjects: Yeah.] Okay. Perfect. All right, what else you got?

BRYAN: Okay. Simple chair, right?

BRYAN: So, you get – you find a chair in the house. Okay. Make sure it’s a really sturdy chair. And you’re gonna stay kind of close, all right,because you wanna keep your back straight,

ERRON JAY: [Interjects] Oh …

BRYAN: Okay, so you don’t create back problems.

ERRON JAY: [Interjects] Okay.

BRYAN: All right, okay so you just start, here. If you can, to 90 degrees.

ERRON JAY: Oh, you’re graceful, like a ballerina.

BRYAN: Well, you know. [Laughs]

ERRON JAY: That’s beautiful. Let me… let me get some of that chair action.

BRYAN: Okay, give that a shot, man.

ERRON JAY: Okay, so, right here.

BRYAN: Uh-huh. Now, don’t get too much lean. Okay. Keep your back straight as much as you can. [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] And just like you would when you’re at the gym. Do you still go to the gym?

ERRON JAY: Huh. Do I still go to the gym?

BRYAN: Are you, are you like me? I mean, I – I don’t go much.

ERRON JAY: Here’s the thing about the gym. The gym is full of judgy cardio.

BRYAN: Oh, tell me about it.

ERRON JAY: Judgy bench presses. Judgy dips. [Bryan interjects: [laughs]] A lot of judgy, judgys in gyms. [Bryan interjects: Judge…yeah.] So, I mean, so this works perfectly because there’s nobody at home to judge me.

BRYAN: Exactly.

ERRON JAY: I don't want to do all that.

BRYAN: Okay, well good. See, you don't have to, to get started again.

ERRON JAY: Hey, are you okay?

BRYAN: Oh, I’m fine.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, are you – what are you doing right now?

BRYAN: I’m workin’ out.

ERRON JAY: What do you mean?

BRYAN: You can do this just standing here talkin’. Calf raises, buddy.

ERRON JAY: What?

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Just this?

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: I feel like I used to do this all the time.

BRYAN: Exactly. But now, we can do it standin’ around, when you’re in the kitchen.

ERRON JAY: I can do this in between TV breaks?

BRYAN: Between TV breaks. What do you usually do between TV breaks?

ERRON JAY: I gotta walk to the kitchen,

BRYAN: [Interjects] Yup.

ERRON JAY: get my steps in.

BRYAN: Yup, There ya go. That's all right. Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Okay, okay. Um. Then I got to open the cabinet and get some snacks.

BRYAN: Okay, and how do you get your snacks? [Erron Jay interjects: Oh, I see what you’re doin’…] So, instead of just reachin’, calf liftin’.

ERRON JAY: Okay, and I can add … can I add the reach in there?

BRYAN: Of course. Oh, here’s a good one. Okay, so you keep doin’ that, all right. [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] So, you probably got this in your refrigerator. You’re gettin’ somethin’ to drink, anyway, right?

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

BRYAN: Okay. Now start reachin’.

ERRON JAY: Oh, I see what you did there.

BRYAN: Yeah, you see that? Add that in a few extra times.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, this feels great, man.

BRYAN: You like that?

ERRON JAY: Yeah, yeah.

BRYAN: I got somethin’ else we can do with those later, too. [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] Do you know what my favorite ones are?

ERRON JAY: What?

BRYAN: Seated.

ERRON JAY: Huh.

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Oh. Seated exer- seated exercises guys. Okay. [Music] So, perfect.

BRYAN: Scoot back in that chair a little bit. Scoot your butt back in it. [Erron Jay interjects: All right.] Okay. Put your arms on the armrests, okay, both of ‘em. Okay, then just push your shoulders up. Okay.

ERRON JAY: Like that?

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Oh, it’s like a little chest…

BRYAN: A little chest thing, a little thing behind the arms.

ERRON JAY: [Interjects] Yeah.

BRYAN: So you know you don’t get that little turkey flap back there.

ERRON JAY: It’s nice.

BRYAN: Yeah, you like that?

ERRON JAY: It’s pretty easy, too.

BRYAN: It is. [Applause]

ERRON JAY: Okay, Yeah. What else you got?

BRYAN: [Laugh] Okay. Well, look, let’s change, then, all right. Now I’ll show you, you come over here. Let me show you a couple of other things, all right. So go ahead and sit down like you normally would.

ERRON JAY: [Interjects] Okay.

BRYAN: So, now, the thing about this, all right, is what was one of the best exercises you ever did to strengthen your thighs?

ERRON JAY: Oh, man umm…probably somethin’ like some leg lifts or something like that.

BRYAN: Leg lifts, leg raises, all right. So think about this, right? When you were sittin’ on your workout bench, okay, you had that little thing back there with some weight on it, right?

ERRON JAY: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

BRYAN: And you’re kickin’ out. [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] Follow me, brother. [Music]

ERRON JAY: Oh, okay.

BRYAN: You can switch up legs, put on a little music. You like that?

ERRON JAY: Ah, I feel it like up in here, too.

BRYAN: That’s right. Gets that major muscle group again. So, we started with the chest and the arms. Now we’re workin’ the legs.

ERRON JAY: [interjects] Uh, uh, uh, uh.

BRYAN: What’s the next one you need to work?

ERRON JAY: Ah … oh.

BRYAN: [Whispering] Yeah … [Erron Jay interjects: The belly. The “B” word.] Yeah. The “B” word.

ERRON JAY: Can I do that sitting down?

BRYAN: You can! Believe it or not, man. This is great. Okay, so, now, I’m gonna bet you know how this reclines.

ERRON JAY: It probably reclines something like this.

BRYAN: There, you got it, okay. Now, normally, when you wanna work your core, you got to tighten up the belly, [Erron Jay interjects: Right.] right? A lot of times we do that with leg raises, right? [ Erron Jay interjects: Right, right.] Okay.

BRYAN: So what do you do when you leg raise? You’re layin’ on the floor [Erron Jay interjects: Umm Hmmm…] you lift your legs about six inches, right?

ERRON JAY: Yeah.

BRYAN: Okay. Work with me, buddy. Look at that.

ERRON JAY: Oh, wow. Oh, right in there.

BRYAN: Feels right there… you feel that, right?

ERRON JAY: Right in there. [Bryan interjects: Okay.] Yeah.

BRYAN: Now check this out. Okay. So, this time you brought your glass and your jug back, [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] okay? So, now, [Applause] [Erron Jay interjects: Oh, at the same time?”] workin’ ‘em at the same time.

ERRON JAY: [Interjects] Oh, okay.

BRYAN: Two-handed. [Erron Jay interjects: Okay.] Look at that. [Music]

ERRON JAY: Iintermittently groans] Ahh. Ahh. [Bryan interjects: Feel the burn!]

ERRON JAY: Along … look at those, look at those biceps, ya’all. So you guys keep doin’ those and we’ll keep doin’ these, and we’ll see you soon.

BRYAN: Yeah.

ERRON JAY: Yeah, [Bryan interjects: Anytime.] I appreciate you, man.

BRYAN: All right.

ERRON JAY: Thank you so much, [Bryan interjects: You got it.] Bryan.

ERRON JAY: Gimme another-nother belly bump.

© 2018 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC.
All rights reserved. SAUS.TJO.18.01.0344

Now Playing:

Amy dishes about food and exercise. Get tips for dealing with “advisors”—and using a workout buddy.

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The Food Police and the "E" Word Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, with me, your straight-talkin' host, Erron Jay!

ERRON: In your life, do you have a food police?

AMY: I do not like the food police.

ERRON: You don’t like the food police?

AMY: It makes me angry. It’s just kind of the, the judgment.

ERRON: It comes off as judgment? Okay.

AMY: It does. And for me it takes away my confidence that yes, indeed, I made a healthy choice. So I have learned kind of a little…I have come up with a couple little smart remarks that I will make to people. Believe me, the more technical that you make it, the more they want you to shut up and go away and get off the elevator, so I try to make it very, “Well, this is 27 carbohydrates and this is gonna match with this.” It works.

ERRON: Oh, so you just throw it back at them.

AMY: Oh, mm-hmm.

ERRON: Yeah? Okay. Let me ask you this, let me ask you this. So, my vice is cake.

AMY: Oh, my friend…

ERRON: Still is. What’s yours?

AMY: Um, I can say truly that cake also is my jam.

ERRON: Yeah?

AMY: Oh yeah. Mine is especially yellow cake with chocolate icing.

ERRON: Ooh.

AMY: It’s just like, “Oh, cake…” So, one of the things that’s really helped me is, um, my glucose meter. I use it like my GPS.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: So if I am really jonesing for a piece of cake, the best thing that I can do is check my blood sugar. And if it’s not, you know, where I want it to be, then I can’t choose that right now.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: But I’ll talk to myself and say, “Okay now, if I can make good, healthy choices for dinner and I have a nice, healthy breakfast tomorrow, maybe I can have my cake tomorrow!”

ERRON: Right.

Amy: So I have learned how to make better choices.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: I can actually say no, Erron.

ERRON: So if I brought in a yellow cake—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —with some chocolate icing—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —from your favorite bakery—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —right now?

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: With a nice, frosty glass of milk?

AMY: I know. La, la, la, I could say no.

ERRON: All right. Bring the cake—I’m just playing. So, tell me about exercise, what’s your regimen? What do you do?

AMY: For me it’s the E word. I just am not a big fan. But I have a friend of mine that we’re kind of in the same boat.

ERRON: Somebody you work with, a coworker?

AMY: We used to work together and we became best friends, and now we don’t work at the same place anymore, but through the magic of text messaging…

ERRON: “Hey BFF, what you doing?”

AMY:Exactly! There were a couple of times when, um, I was able to get a little bit of a break and so did she, and we were both taking a walk at the same time, but we were two cities away from each other. You know, my kids are home a little bit more, um, they are doing a lot more to say, “Mom, let’s get out and take this walk” or “Let’s go here and let’s do this.”

ERRON: Right.

AMY: So that way, they’re kind of helping me to get out and do stuff like that, ‘cause I have to be accountable to somebody or it’s not going to happen.

ERRON: Oh, I get that.

AMY: That kind of stuff really helps.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

Now Playing:

Amy talks about pressure, coping, and life hacks. Get tips like bringing a “safe” dish to parties.

Download Transcript

Help for the Holidays Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: So, Christmas time. You've got the cakes, the pies, the cookies.

AMY: Yeah.

ERRON: So you see your favorite cookie.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: You know, is, is there any stress around surrounded with not necessarily being able to enjoy that cookie like that you really want to, or, or—

AMY: Absolutely.

ERRON: —a number of those cookies?

AMY: Absolutely. Um, it can be really stressful, and of course the food police really comes out at holiday time.

ERRON: Oh yeah, they do.

AMY: Oh, don't they? They come out of the woodwork. Right? "Are you supposed to be eating that?" [Sighs] That alone is stressful. That alone is stressful. And also I, I do kind of lose a little bit of my confidence around the holidays, and I think it's because, you know, your normal routine is kind of thrown out the window.

But I, I try to get, kind of get back to it, kind of think about it ahead of time,knowing that, you know, okay, we're going to go here, and this is kind of what the spread is going to look like. And I'm expecting that these kind of foods are going to be there, and there are going to be some yummy trigger foods. You know, my,my little peanut butter blossoms are going to be there. So it's kind of leading up to that, I try to really stick to things, really try to focus on, you know, making healthy choices, maybe even make healthier choices than maybe I normally would, just so that that way when I get there and I am kind of faced with that spread, it's kind of like, okay, I, I can handle this.

ERRON: Yeah.

AMY: And you learn some tricks. You know, there a couple things that I learned about going to holiday parties.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: The first thing I learned is always—

ERRON: Tell me, because I need to know.

AMY: —always have a cup with water or your beverage of choice, you know,your low-calorie beverage of choice in there has really been helpful for me, because then you don't have the host coming up to you all the time trying to refill your drink.

ERRON: Oh, that's sneaky. Okay. Give me another one.

AMY: The other thing, too, is, um, small plates.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: Because if you, if you, if you kind of fill up a small plate, that's still not nearly as much food as what's on a big plate.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And, you know, and I always try to make sure that when I go to a holiday party—like the last time I went there were all these crazy, you know, super-highcalorie crazy party food. And I brought something that I had made that I knew what was in it. So I knew it was kind of safe, for lack of a better word.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: So I made sure that I had, you know, I had a small plate. I had, you know,my veggies and my hummus, which is my favorite thing.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: Um, especially at parties, and then I would have some of, you know, the little casserole that I had brought, that I knew was fairly safe. So that way, again,when the host kind of comes around to check on you, "Hey, how ya' doing?” “Have you tried this?" You're like, "Oh, oh, everything is just delicious. Everything is just great."/p>

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And that way you don't feel like, you don't feel nearly as much pressure,because they're not giving it to you.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And you feel like, oh, you know, I can handle this.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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A greeting from the host of a different kind of show that covers the “dia-do’s and dia-don’ts” of diabetes.

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Meet Erron Jay Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: Hello, hello, hello, everyone. I'm Erron Jay, and I'll be your host for this series of one-on-one conversations with people just like you and me who duke it out daily with the dia-burden of diabetes, just me and a friend telling our truths about what we dia-do and dia-don't. I've been living with type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Like so many of us, when I got diagnosed I thought the party was over.

I remember looking up a few of the symptoms I noticed online: thirst, fatigue,frequent urination, and it said for me I could have either had diabetes, a urinary tract infection, or something else. And, you know, you've never seen a grown man pray so hard for a urinary tract infection in your life. But sure enough, after talking with my doctor it was clear; I had diabetes.

Current statistics say that one in ten Americans have diabetes. The problem is,for a disease this common, it doesn't seem like people are talking enough about what it's actually like to live with it. So we're here to change that.

We're going to cover all the angles, like food. In my case, I had to say goodbye to my regular cake sessions. If I'm being real with you all, cake meant more to me than my own dog—and I love my dog. Cake has always been my jam. Cake with jam is also my jam.

But now if I want a single slice, my doctor says I need to up my exercise and check my blood glucose, and it means no cake for me tomorrow. I've slapped my own wrist in public. Ha, no cake for you, Erron. Did strangers look at me like I had lost my mind? Maybe. Did not eating the cake help stop my blood sugar from spiking? Darn right it did.

You see, it's all about finding balance. We're here to share our experiences, tips,tricks, and life hacks so we can all feel less alone and hopefully make better decisions along the way. So, let's get started.

Our first guest is a diabetes diva from Dayton, Ohio. Here's Amy. Amy!

AMY: Hello my friend.

ERRON: How are you?

AMY: I am good.

ERRON: Good to see you. Hey, you have a seat.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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Host Erron sits down with Amy to talk about coming to terms with her diabetes.

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Queen of Denial Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, with me, your straight talkin’ host, Erron Jay!

ERRON: Our first guest is a diabetes diva from Dayton, Ohio. Here's Amy. Amy!

AMY: Hello, my friend.

ERRON: How are you?

AMY: I am good.

ERRON: Good to see you. Hey, you have a seat. Amy, Amy, Amy, now, um, tell us a little bit about yourself.

AMY: Well, I am married. I have three kids.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: And, um, I work as a nurse at a hospital.

ERRON: Okay. So three kids. Let me ask you something—

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: ...and a husband—

AMY: And a husband.

ERRON: ...so four kids.

AMY: Yeah. You got that right. Yeah.

ERRON: How long have you been living with diabetes?

AMY: So it'll be almost 20 years this year.

ERRON: Oh, wow, two decades.

AMY: Yeah. Now I'm not saying I've been the perfect patient with diabetes for that whole time, because that is not true.

ERRON: That's okay. That's okay. Nobody's perfect. Right?

AMY: Absolutely not.

ERRON: All right. I mean that's why we're here. We're here to get real.

Amy: And you know what they say about nurses being such great patients.

ERRON: Yeah, like Nurse Ratched.

AMY: True. Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no. No, no, no, no, no. I'm nice.

ERRON: Oh, that's what you say now.

AMY: Well, true.

ERRON: For all our friends that are out there, that are watching us talk about this and getting real with it, how important is that support system for you to keep you, you know, moving along?

AMY: Well, in addition to the four lovely people that live in my house, um, there are also my dad, my sister and her family, and they have actually been the most supportive in helping me to get from out of control to under control. And now that I've been working a little bit harder, and they've been seeing the results of what I'm trying to do, and they're understanding what it is, you know, why I need to take a break to do this, why it's time for me to just take a break and check my blood sugar, and do make a choice based on the result of that blood sugar. Now that they understand that, it's extremely supportive. So they have been really wonderful.

ERRON: So before this were, um—

AMY: They were not.

ERRON: Did they—well, did they see you like—were you—did they think you were using it as a crutch? Is that what it was?

AMY: Oh no, no. My friend, Erron, I was the queen of denial.

ERRON: Oh.

AMY: I had the biggest crown and the most jewels that there were possible.

ERRON: Your highness.

AMY: Oh, absolutely. So I really wasn't doing what I needed to do to take care of myself. And so because I wasn't doing that, because I wasn't focusing on it, because I was pretending it wasn't there, then they didn't think it even existed. So they didn't even know what to do.

ERRON: So what were you in denial about?

AMY: Oh, Erron, it was everything. It was, um, first of all that there was something wrong with me, second of all, that there were things that I needed to do to take care of myself. I went to the doctor's office. The doctor would say, um, "You need to lose weight. You need to eat healthy," and then I would go home and do nothing. You know, I really made no changes to my diet. I was not doing anything, anything in the real—in the realm of exercise. And checking my blood sugar? Ha, ha. No. Um, they had prescribed one pill for me. I mean it shouldn't have been hard. Right? I mean it was one pill one day, you know, once a day. How hard can that be? I would continually forget to take it. And then I would go back and I would have to go see the doctor, and it would get worse and worse each time until finally it was, why are you not doing this?

ERRON: Your doctor had to get real with diabetes.

AMY: Oh. She, she finally got really, um—I wouldn't say it was angry, ‘cause she, ‘cause she wasn't, you know, like [makes growling sound], but she really let me have it. She really did get real with me and said, "Listen. You have this problem."

ERRON: Now was it negative or that's how you perceived it?

AMY: I'm sure I probably did think I was being spanked.

ERRON: Because she sounds like she's pretty awesome.

AMY: Well, you're right, she is awesome, but don't tell her that.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: Okay.

ERRON: On the hush.

AMY: Shh, shh, shh, shh. But I was starting to have symptoms. I was starting to have some complications. The biggest one was fatigue. I was so tired all the time. I would find myself, I would sit down in a chair and I would go to sleep.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: So it took, it really took my dad, who kind of came to me and said, "You know what? I'm really worried about you." And, of course, I'm like, "What are you talking about?"

ERRON: Right. "I'm good."

AMY: You know, "I am fine." But, um, but then we had a really great conversation, and it had happened, you know, after we had lost my mom, and basically it was, you know, "I'm worried about you."

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: So I think a lot of the reason why I went into denial was because I was so overwhelmed at all the things I had to do.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: And the biggest thing was that I had to make changes to my lifestyle, and that's scary.

ERRON: Gotcha.

AMY: But again, having that conversation with him was, I think, one of the things that really helped me to kind of open the door, you know, like I said, open the door to allow people in to help me, and for me, again, to take some of those first steps toward getting myself under control.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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After feeling overwhelmed about starting insulin, Amy found small steps helped her to move forward.

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Baby Steps Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: Was there something that just snapped Amy out of her denial, and you were like, "I am going to live this type of lifestyle. I'm going to make these changes," and how do you feel now because you made that decision?

AMY: It was about four and a half years ago, and I was taking baby steps. I had started with taking my medicine and checking my blood sugar. That was my priority, with one pill that was once a day.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: And then I started to kind of add in some of the other things. So I started to, um,walk a little bit more.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: But the really key part was when I went back to the doctor, and she checked my A1C, and she lost her mind.

ERRON: (Chuckling)

AMY: She took me to the other partners in the practice and said, "You are not going to believe this." I got hugs, I got high fives, I got fist bumps from the other three doctors in the practice. I'm a different person now, because I figured out I could take care of myself.

ERRON: Like you said, if you don't take care of yourself, who's going to do it?

AMY: Right?

ERRON: Yeah. If you had—to keep it real.

AMY: Yeah?

ERRON: I mean real—

AMY: Oh, really real?

ERRON: I mean all the way real.

AMY: All right.

ERRON: I mean for real, for real.

AMY: Okay.

ERRON: That's what, that's when you know it's serious, when you say it twice in a row.

BOTH: For real, for real.

ERRON: Yeah. What would you tell somebody getting their, their diagnosis right now?And they're feeling like the world is collapsing around them. What would you tell them?

AMY: We need to break it down.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: You know, when you go to the doctor.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: Especially that first time you're diagnosed.

ERRON: All right.

AMY: Um, "You need to lose weight. You need to eat healthy."

ERRON: Your "welcome to diabetes bullet points."

AMY: Yup, and you kind of leave the office and you're like, what just happened? It's taking baby steps. Because, again, I think a lot of the reason why I went into denial was because I was so overwhelmed at all the things I had to do. So the first thing that I focused on was checking my blood sugar and taking my medicine. Let's get a quick win.

ERRON: Gotcha.

AMY: So you just take those little, tiny moments, put them together, and that's what's going to really help, help you be successful.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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Amy dishes about food and exercise. Get tips for dealing with “advisors”—and using a workout buddy.

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The Food Police and the "E" Word Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, with me, your straight-talkin' host, Erron Jay!

ERRON: In your life, do you have a food police?

AMY: I do not like the food police.

ERRON: You don’t like the food police?

AMY: It makes me angry. It’s just kind of the, the judgment.

ERRON: It comes off as judgment? Okay.

AMY: It does. And for me it takes away my confidence that yes, indeed, I made a healthy choice. So I have learned kind of a little…I have come up with a couple little smart remarks that I will make to people. Believe me, the more technical that you make it, the more they want you to shut up and go away and get off the elevator, so I try to make it very, “Well, this is 27 carbohydrates and this is gonna match with this.” It works.

ERRON: Oh, so you just throw it back at them.

AMY: Oh, mm-hmm.

ERRON: Yeah? Okay. Let me ask you this, let me ask you this. So, my vice is cake.

AMY: Oh, my friend…

ERRON: Still is. What’s yours?

AMY: Um, I can say truly that cake also is my jam.

ERRON: Yeah?

AMY: Oh yeah. Mine is especially yellow cake with chocolate icing.

ERRON: Ooh.

AMY: It’s just like, “Oh, cake…” So, one of the things that’s really helped me is, um, my glucose meter. I use it like my GPS.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: So if I am really jonesing for a piece of cake, the best thing that I can do is check my blood sugar. And if it’s not, you know, where I want it to be, then I can’t choose that right now.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: But I’ll talk to myself and say, “Okay now, if I can make good, healthy choices for dinner and I have a nice, healthy breakfast tomorrow, maybe I can have my cake tomorrow!”

ERRON: Right.

Amy: So I have learned how to make better choices.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: I can actually say no, Erron.

ERRON: So if I brought in a yellow cake—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —with some chocolate icing—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —from your favorite bakery—

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: —right now?

AMY: I could say no.

ERRON: With a nice, frosty glass of milk?

AMY: I know. La, la, la, I could say no.

ERRON: All right. Bring the cake—I’m just playing. So, tell me about exercise, what’s your regimen? What do you do?

AMY: For me it’s the E word. I just am not a big fan. But I have a friend of mine that we’re kind of in the same boat.

ERRON: Somebody you work with, a coworker?

AMY: We used to work together and we became best friends, and now we don’t work at the same place anymore, but through the magic of text messaging…

ERRON: “Hey BFF, what you doing?”

AMY:Exactly! There were a couple of times when, um, I was able to get a little bit of a break and so did she, and we were both taking a walk at the same time, but we were two cities away from each other. You know, my kids are home a little bit more, um, they are doing a lot more to say, “Mom, let’s get out and take this walk” or “Let’s go here and let’s do this.”

ERRON: Right.

AMY: So that way, they’re kind of helping me to get out and do stuff like that, ‘cause I have to be accountable to somebody or it’s not going to happen.

ERRON: Oh, I get that.

AMY: That kind of stuff really helps.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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Amy talks about pressure, coping, and life hacks. Get tips like bringing a “safe” dish to parties.

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Help for the Holidays Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: So, Christmas time. You've got the cakes, the pies, the cookies.

AMY: Yeah.

ERRON: So you see your favorite cookie.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: You know, is, is there any stress around surrounded with not necessarily being able to enjoy that cookie like that you really want to, or, or—

AMY: Absolutely.

ERRON: —a number of those cookies?

AMY: Absolutely. Um, it can be really stressful, and of course the food police really comes out at holiday time.

ERRON: Oh yeah, they do.

AMY: Oh, don't they? They come out of the woodwork. Right? "Are you supposed to be eating that?" [Sighs] That alone is stressful. That alone is stressful. And also I, I do kind of lose a little bit of my confidence around the holidays, and I think it's because, you know, your normal routine is kind of thrown out the window.

But I, I try to get, kind of get back to it, kind of think about it ahead of time,knowing that, you know, okay, we're going to go here, and this is kind of what the spread is going to look like. And I'm expecting that these kind of foods are going to be there, and there are going to be some yummy trigger foods. You know, my,my little peanut butter blossoms are going to be there. So it's kind of leading up to that, I try to really stick to things, really try to focus on, you know, making healthy choices, maybe even make healthier choices than maybe I normally would, just so that that way when I get there and I am kind of faced with that spread, it's kind of like, okay, I, I can handle this.

ERRON: Yeah.

AMY: And you learn some tricks. You know, there a couple things that I learned about going to holiday parties.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: The first thing I learned is always—

ERRON: Tell me, because I need to know.

AMY: —always have a cup with water or your beverage of choice, you know,your low-calorie beverage of choice in there has really been helpful for me, because then you don't have the host coming up to you all the time trying to refill your drink.

ERRON: Oh, that's sneaky. Okay. Give me another one.

AMY: The other thing, too, is, um, small plates.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: Because if you, if you, if you kind of fill up a small plate, that's still not nearly as much food as what's on a big plate.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And, you know, and I always try to make sure that when I go to a holiday party—like the last time I went there were all these crazy, you know, super-highcalorie crazy party food. And I brought something that I had made that I knew what was in it. So I knew it was kind of safe, for lack of a better word.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: So I made sure that I had, you know, I had a small plate. I had, you know,my veggies and my hummus, which is my favorite thing.

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: Um, especially at parties, and then I would have some of, you know, the little casserole that I had brought, that I knew was fairly safe. So that way, again,when the host kind of comes around to check on you, "Hey, how ya' doing?” “Have you tried this?" You're like, "Oh, oh, everything is just delicious. Everything is just great."/p>

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And that way you don't feel like, you don't feel nearly as much pressure,because they're not giving it to you.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: And you feel like, oh, you know, I can handle this.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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Amy talks about how she overcame her fear of injections.

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But it's a Shot Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, with me, your straighttalkin' host, Erron Jay!

ERRON: So I understand that you, uh, take insulin.

AMY: Mm-hmm. So for quite some time my diabetes was changing, but I didn't know.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: So when I went back to see the doctor, and I go in and we have the conversation where, "You're going to have to take insulin."

ERRON: Gotcha.

AMY: I took it very negatively, and, and, again, you know, you've got to remember I'm still in a place of fear. Right? So now one of my worst fears is coming true, and that is, wow, I must be really bad if I have to take insulin. Okay?Because only the really bad ones take insulin. Right? I mean that was my misperception.

ERRON: Right.

AMY: But it was still my perception. So that kind of flared my, my, um, my denial again, because, because, again, the whole denial, you know, my denial was all based on fear.

ERRON: Yeah.

AMY: And I'm a thinker. So it was like, you know, this is really what's going to help, and then, of course, the lizard side of my brain takes over and is like, "But I have to—it's a shot!”

ERRON: Right.

AMY: “It's going to hurt." Right? So, okay. I'm a nurse. Right?

ERRON: Right.

AMY: I can give shots to everyone. I can give shots to—yeah, not a problem. I can give shots without a problem. But giving it to yourself?

ERRON: That can be a big one.

AMY: That's a whole other story. So finally, finally, finally, I, I put the needle on, I prepped the pen. I kind of took a big, deep breath, and boom, I did it. It was kind of like [sings], I did it!

ERRON: Achievement unlocked.

AMY: Yes. The, the key to that whole thing—

ERRON: Mm-hmm.

AMY: —was, six months after I had started it, when I went back to the doctor,and she checked my A1C and she looked at my glucose logs, and we saw progress.

ERRON: Okay.

AMY: And it's like, wow! I can do this!

ERRON: So you just had to rip the Band-Aid off.

AMY: I did. I did, and it was—

ERRON: You just had to do it.

AMY: Yeah, and of course it wasn't a fast pull. Right?

ERRON: Right.

AMY: You know, it took me a while.

ERRON: It takes a little bit longer.

AMY: So it was like, eek, eek, eek, yeah. So then it was kind of like, okay, okay, I think I got this. Okay, I think I got this.

ANNOUNCER: Stick around for more of Straight Talk About Diabetes.

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Amy shares her experience with Toujeo. Plus, she gives heartfelt advice for anyone who’s starting insulin.

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Toujeo Time Video Transcript

ANNOUNCER: Welcome to Straight Talk About Diabetes, the talk show made FOR people with diabetes—BY people with diabetes.

ERRON: Now in terms of medication, you're on Toujeo®.

AMY: Insulin glargine injection, 300 units per milliliter.

ERRON: For those who may not be familiar, Toujeo is from the makers of Lantus®. It's a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. Long-acting insulin is taken once a day. It takes longer to start working in the bloodstream, but it lasts all day long.

AMY: Right.

ERRON: Also, Toujeo contains three times as much insulin in one milliliter as standard insulin, 100 units per milliliter.

[Phone buzzes] Hold on, I got to get this.

[Looks at phone] Hmm.

[Addresses camera] So there are limitations of use for Toujeo that everyone should know. Toujeo is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Also, Toujeo should not be used in children. So, Amy, how are you doing since you started on Toujeo?

AMY: My blood sugar levels are normal throughout the day when I measure, and my last A1C was in my target range.

ERRON: Ooh, that's great. I should note that Toujeo is not for everyone, and individual results may vary.

[Phone buzzes] But wait. There's more. This time it's Important Safety Information about Toujeo. Do not take Toujeo if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo.

AMY: Yeah, that's important.

ERRON: Also, do not reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. What would you tell somebody who is just getting the news that insulin is the next step for them?

AMY: That don't be afraid. This isn't about, you know, that your disease is so far gone that this is the only thing that's going to help you, that we're able to use that as a tool.

ERRON: That's—I think that's great advice.

AMY: So, yeah.

ERRON: I mean because you hear "insulin" or you hear "medication" period, and you're like—

AMY: Yeah. Yeah, it's like, oh, it's over.

ERRON: I'm only taking this medication because I am so bad.

AMY: Right. Right.

ERRON: But not the case.

AMY: No.

ERRON: You're taking this medication because you need it—

AMY: Right.

[Phone buzzes]

ERRON: Mom! No, no, no, no. No, no, mom. Ma! Ma! I'm doing an interview right now. I love you too, pooh bear. Okay, bye.

Sorry. My mother says, "Hello, Amy."

AMY: Hello, mom.

ERRON: Yeah. What are some of the names you've heard maybe diabetes be called other than diabetes?

AMY: Oh, the sugar is my favorite.

ERRON: The sugar.

AMY: The sugar.

ERRON: Oh, you got the sugar, baby!

AMY: Oh, well why are you doing that? I don't have the sugar.

ERRON: My sugar's in check.

AMY: My sugar's fine. And I check it and it's 327.

ERRON: Right. Right, because you ate three pieces of cake.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: With jam in it.

AMY: Mm-hmm.

ERRON: Amy, thank you so much for joining me, keeping it real with me.

AMY: It has been my pleasure. It has been my pleasure.

ERRON: And, um, you're welcome back.

AMY: I hope we can get real again sometime soon.

ERRON: You're welcome back any time. Mi casa su casa.

AMY: Oh, thank you.

ERRON: Amy, let's move. Yeah, get that exercise in, girl. Yeah, you better boogie. Get it. Get it. Get it. This show has been brought to you by Toujeo. To learn more visit Toujeo.com.

What is Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL?

Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL)
  • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Toujeo® should not be used in children

Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

Please see link below for Full Prescribing Information for Toujeo.

[Whistles] Hey. All right. Wait, you're still here? Huh. Good on you.

[Whistles]

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